Wikimedia Research/Design Research/Reading Team UX Research/iOS Guerilla Testing

This page serves as an update on guerrilla testing[1] we are running for iOS features. Started Q1 FY 2016-2017.

"Random" article browsing experience usability test, 7/15 - 7/18/2016Edit

 
Random article feature testing for the iOS app

Question: Can participants easily browse through a series of random articles?

Approach: Showed each participant the (unreleased) build on my device, asked each to find a way to read a Random article, noted behavior in Explore feed as well as in-article. In article, if participants didn't beat me to it, asked them if they'd want to see another Random article and, if so, how they would do it.

Build/Version tested: 5.0.5 899 (branch random_alternate/T127899)

Participants: (see below) tech & non-tech workers around the Wikimedia office, downtown SF

Conclusions: Everyone had a positive experience with the Random feature and there were no usability issues.

P1: Male, mid 30's, in tech

Knows about Wikipedia? Yes

Knows about/uses app? Knows about it, doesn't use it

Knows about random articles? Yes

Explore page tapping behavior: Taps article itself

Article random-tapping behavior: Taps tab with dice. Did not see dice at first. It was clear to him that tapping it brought him to the next Random article.

Feedback from participant: (Before I arranged the explore feed to show less) It's not easy to locate any way to find Random articles. About the actual random dice feature: It's fun, it makes sense, I like it, I like how it goes away and then comes back as I scroll.

Notes: Seems a "yes" to research question.

P2: Male, mid 40's, not in tech

Knows about Wikipedia? Yes

Knows about/uses app? No to both

Knows about random articles? No

Explore page tapping behavior: Taps the photo of the article. "Wouldn't tap it though because I don't care about airports in that country."

Article random-tapping behavior: Immediately sees dice and knows to tap it.

Feedback from participant: It's really cool and fun. I don't know if I would use it. I come to Wikipedia for very specific info.

Notes: Seems a "yes" to research question.

P3: Female, late 30's, not in tech

Knows about Wikipedia? Yes

Knows about/uses app? Knows about it, doesn't use apps very much, prefers browser

Knows about random articles? Yes

Explore page tapping behavior: Double taps the main image for random article. After first Random tap, goes back to Explore, taps the bottom part "Another Random Article" to get to another one.

Article random-tapping behavior: Sees the dice and knows she should tap it immediately. Does it a few times.

Feedback from participant: "I wish the dice or tab were bigger. My 'old person' eyes don't like this size." Says the feature is fun and "she could get into it."

Notes: Seems a "yes" to research question. Even though the first time she went back to Explore, she still very much saw and used the dice and it was easy/enjoyable for her.

P4: Male, 40's/50's, not in tech

Knows about Wikipedia? Yes

Knows about/uses app? No/No

Knows about random articles? No

Explore page tapping behavior: Taps article card, expects to go into article.

Article random-tapping behavior: Taps the dice immediately. No issues.

Feedback from participant: Thinks it's "neat." He thinks "a lot of people" would enjoy it. Dunno if he enjoyed it, maybe he was shy, not a lot of other feedback.

Notes: Very straightforward, seems a yes to research question.

P5: Female, 30's, in tech

Knows about Wikipedia? Yes, loves it

Knows about/uses app? No, but expected there was probably an app because everyone has one

Knows about random articles? No

Explore page tapping behavior: Taps the main article card itself

Article random-tapping behavior: Immediately notices and uses the dice. Scrolls around, is curious what happens to it. Jumps around to other articles.

Feedback from participant: Likes it and says she would use it probably if she was bored. Wonders if you could make the Random articles more specific to things she likes, like on StumbleUpon.

Notes: Seems a yes to research question.