Open main menu

Meza/Secret config

The secret config directory, located at /opt/conf-meza/secret, holds information about multiple Meza environments. Within each environment sub-directory is contained the following info:

  • secret.yml (encrypted)
  • The hosts file, AKA "Inventory" file (not encrypted)
  • SSL certs (encrypted)

secret.ymlEdit

The secret config file, located at /opt/conf-meza/secret/<your environment name>/secret.yml, is used to hold sensitive information like passwords.

What's in this file that users want to change?Edit

  • wiki_app_fqdn: This is the fully qualified domain name for your server. If you're using Vagrant, it's just the virtual machine's IP address (probably 192.168.56.56). For enterprisemediawiki.org this value is enterprisemediawiki.org
  • Add SAML info per Meza/Setup SAML authentication

Editing the encrypted secret.yml fileEdit

The secret.yml file is encrypted automatically by Meza because it stores passwords and other sensitive information. This allows the file to be stored in version control systems with greater security. It makes it more difficult to use, however, because you must use special commands to edit the file. To do so, perform the steps below. It is well understood that this is an incredibly cumbersome process and it needs to be simplified.

  1. First, set a variable called meza_env to your desired Meza environment. This is likely monolith or vagrant but could be anything if you explicitly setup an environment. For example, paste the following into your terminal if your environment is monolith:
    meza_env=monolith
    
  2. Then run the following ansible-vault edit command which will de-crypt the secret.yml file and automatically begin editing it (Note the path below may not be correct. Use find /opt/conf-meza/ -name "*vault*" to locate the file):
    sudo ansible-vault edit "/opt/conf-meza/secret/$meza_env/secret.yml" --vault-password-file "/opt/conf-meza/users/meza-ansible/.vault-pass-$meza_env.txt"
    
  3. Edit the file using the Vi editor.
  4. Save the file by typing :wq.
  5. Do sudo meza deploy <environment> to apply your configuration changes to your server

Variable-level encryptionEdit

Your secret.yml file may not be fully encrypted. Instead, it may only encrypt the variables. Read this documentation for details.

If you need to view an encrypted variable, this reference is helpful. Here's an example:

sudo ansible localhost -m debug -a var='my_password' -e "/opt/conf-meza/secret/$meza_env/secret.yml" --vault-password-file "/opt/conf-meza/vault/vault-pass-$meza_env.txt"

hosts fileEdit

The hosts file determines where all the parts of your Meza installation go. On a standard "monolithic" installation everything is installed on localhost. See the next section below. A more interesting setup may distribute parts of the install across many servers. See the second section below.

A standard "monolith" hosts fileEdit

# Ansible inventory (AKA "hosts") file
#
# http://docs.ansible.com/ansible/intro_inventory.html

# Tell Ansible to use a local connection for localhost
localhost ansible_connection=local

[load-balancers]
localhost

[app-servers]
localhost

[memcached-servers]
localhost

[db-master]
localhost

# Note: db-slaves needs to be in the form:
# 1.2.3.4   mysql_server_id=2   # ids must be unique and greater than 1
[db-slaves]

[parsoid-servers]
localhost

[elastic-servers]
localhost

[backup-servers]
localhost

[logging-servers]
localhost

A multi-server hosts fileEdit

This hosts file defines a more complicated setup. It does not use Meza's load balancer, but relies on an external one. It has two app servers (running PHP and MediaWiki) that are also functioning as Memcached servers and the location that backups are dumped. It has one database master and one database replica (slave). Two separate servers are running Parsoid, and two are running Elasticsearch. Additionally, it is setup to pull backups from example.com.

# Ansible inventory (AKA "hosts") file
#
# http://docs.ansible.com/ansible/intro_inventory.html

# Tell Ansible to use a local connection for localhost
localhost ansible_connection=local

[load-balancers]

[load-balancers-unmanaged]
255.1.255.140
255.1.255.141
255.1.255.142

[app-servers]
1.2.3.160
1.2.3.161

[memcached-servers]
1.2.3.160
1.2.3.161

[db-master]
1.2.3.166

# Note: db-slaves needs to be in the form:
# 1.2.3.4   mysql_server_id=2   # ids must be unique and greater than 1
[db-slaves]
1.2.3.167 mysql_server_id=2

[parsoid-servers]
1.2.3.164
1.2.3.165

[elastic-servers]
1.2.3.162
1.2.3.163

[backup-servers]
1.2.3.160
1.2.3.161

[logging-servers]

# Sourcing from example.com
[db-src]
example.com alt_remote_user=src-meza-ansible

[backup-src]
example.com alt_remote_user=src-meza-ansible

[exclude-all]
example.com

SSL certEdit

SSL certs are contained here, but meza deploy puts them where the load balancer needs them.